PulpMags

The official blog for the Pulp Magazines Project, an open-access digital archive of early twentieth-century pulp magazines

Archive for the month “September, 2014”

Archive Reaches 300 Issues

With the addition of 10 new issues of Adventure (Teddy Roosevelt’s favorite pulp) from 1911-25, the digital archive of the Pulp Magazines Project has reached 300 individual issues. As of Sept. 2014, the archive includes 85 titles from over two dozen publishers, with its special features on Comic Books & Pulp PublishersSnappy, Spicy, and Girlie Pulps; and Pulp, Slick, & Book-Paper Magazines. In these latest issues of Adventure, “America’s No. 1 Pulp“, we have novels and short stories by John Buchan (Jun. 1911), W.C. Tuttle (Aug. 1916), Edgar Wallace (Apr. 3, 1918), Hugh Pendexter (Jul. 18, 1918), Charles Beadle (Aug. 3, 1918), Talbot Mundy (Aug. 18, 1918), Arthur O. Friel (Dec. 3, 1919), H. Bedford-Jones (Aug. 10, 1925), and many more.

New Scans II, September 2014

The Pulp Magazines Project wishes to thank the Pulpscans Group, Digital Pulp Preservation, the Digital Comic MuseumNewsstand: 1925, and Conrad First for all their help.

Next month, we’ll be posting 6 more issues (Vol. 53) of Adventure from the summer of 1925, along with several new issues of Argosy, Blue Book, and Western Story.

New Issues/ Title: Startling Stories (9/10/2014)

The Pulp Magazines Project has added 10 new issues (and 1 new SF title) to its full-text digital archive. They are the Jan., Mar., May, & Nov. 1939; Jan. & May 1940; Nov. 1941; Jun. 1946; and Jan. & May 1947 issues of Startling Stories, feat. works by Stan Weinbaum (Jan. 1939), Otis Adelbert Kline (Guest Editorial-“Prophets of Science” Jan. 1939), Ed Hamilton (May 1939), Robert Bloch (Nov. 1941), Henry Kuttner (Jun. 1946), Murray Leinster (Jan. 1947), and Robert A. Heinlein (May 1947) among others.

New Scans, September 2014

This brings the total number of full-text issues available on the PMP website to 282. In related news, the PMP website was migrated to a new server last week, which should result in faster download times, esp. for those large (50+ MB) PDF files.

Cheers.

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