PulpMags

The official blog for the Pulp Magazines Project, an open-access digital archive of early twentieth-century pulp magazines

Archive for the category “New Titles”

New Issues/ Titles/ Contexts (2/25/2015): Dime Novels and Nickel Weeklies

The Pulp Magazines Project has just added 8 issues of “dime novels” and “nickel weeklies” published between 1892 and 1922 to its website. The titles include Frank Reade Library, Tip Top Weekly, Nick Carter Weekly, Deadwood Dick Library, Buffalo Bill Stories, All-Sports Library, All Around Weekly, and Wild West Weekly.

New Scans_Feb. 2015

To view them, click here.

Publishers represented by this group include Street & Smith, Beadle & Adams, The Winner Library Co., Frank Tousey, and Harry E. Wolff. Information and metadata listed alongside each issue includes publication date, year established, publisher, and an estimated total number of issues published.

For more information on the dime novels as a 19th-century publishing phenomenon, check out Tim DeForest’s chapter on “Dime Novels,” from Storytelling in the Pulps, Comics, and Radio: How Technology Changed Popular Fiction in America (2004). It can be accessed through GoogleBooks here.

Cheers.

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New Issues/ Title: Startling Stories (9/10/2014)

The Pulp Magazines Project has added 10 new issues (and 1 new SF title) to its full-text digital archive. They are the Jan., Mar., May, & Nov. 1939; Jan. & May 1940; Nov. 1941; Jun. 1946; and Jan. & May 1947 issues of Startling Stories, feat. works by Stan Weinbaum (Jan. 1939), Otis Adelbert Kline (Guest Editorial-“Prophets of Science” Jan. 1939), Ed Hamilton (May 1939), Robert Bloch (Nov. 1941), Henry Kuttner (Jun. 1946), Murray Leinster (Jan. 1947), and Robert A. Heinlein (May 1947) among others.

New Scans, September 2014

This brings the total number of full-text issues available on the PMP website to 282. In related news, the PMP website was migrated to a new server last week, which should result in faster download times, esp. for those large (50+ MB) PDF files.

Cheers.

New Issues/ Titles: Amazing Stories Quarterly, Mammoth Adventure, Mammoth Mystery, Planet Stories, and Wonder Stories Quarterly (2/10/2014)

The Pulp Magazines Project has added 10 new issues (and 4 new over-sized pulp titles) to its full-text digital archive. They include the Win.-Fall 1928 issues of Amazing Stories Quarterly, feat. A. Hyatt Verrill’s The World of the Giant Ants (Fall 1928); the Nov. 1946 issue of Mammoth Adventure, feat. Tom W. Blackburn’s The Cassock and the Sword; the January 1946 issue of Mammoth Mystery; the Summer 1932 issue of Wonder Stories Quarterly, feat. Raymond Gallum’s “The Menace from Mercury”; and 3 new issues of Planet Stories (May & Jul. 1951, and Jan. 1954). This brings the total number of full-text magazines available on the PMP website to 245.

New Scans, November 2013 & February 2014And finally, in October and January, histories for Planet Stories and Dynamic Science Stories (Nathan Vernon Madison, VCU) were made available as well. For further news and updates to the site, along with a complete list of issues and title histories posted, check out our News & Updates page here.

Cheers.

 

New Issues/ Titles: Western Pulp Magazines (9/15/2013)

The Pulp Magazines Project has added 6 new Western pulp titles (8 new complete issues) to its full-text digital archive. These include All Western Magazine (Apr.-Jun. 1950; feat. Ernest Haycox, The Feudists); Exciting Western (Sept. 1947; featuring W.C. Tuttle, Alias Adam Jones); Fifteen Western Tales (Jan. 1953); Masked Rider Western (Winter 1945 & Nov. 1950); Ten Story Western (December 1949; feat. Tom Roan, Yellow Devil Starves Tonight!); and Two-Gun Western (Novels) (Apr. 1942 & Nov. 1955).

New Scans, September 2013For more information on the history of Western pulp magazines, check out John A. Dinan’s The Pulp Western: A Popular History of the Western Fiction Magazine in America. For an excellent memoir on writing for the Western pulps, see Pulp Writer: Twenty Years of Writing for the American Grub Street, by Paul S. Powers.

Cheers, pardners.

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